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Pineapple beads (or more beads from the bead box)

IMG_6189.JPGI know that in Monday’s post, I said that wedding cake beads are one of my favorite beads but its really hard to actually choose just one favorite. I think it’ll be like asking which of your kids you prefer.  So today, I’m featuring another bead that I’m pretty obsessed with. The pineapple bead, specifically the pink pineapple.

Isn’t that the funniest name for a bead? I think the name must have come about because of the cross-hatch of lines running throughout the bead as well as the many eyes that decorate it.   It does do a good job of describing this bead. Now, my hands down preferred pineapple is of course the pink version. An antique dealer once told me that the early Venetian bead makers, skilled as they were in making beads, couldn’t make bright pink colored beads.  This was just something they couldn’t do because at that time, synthetic dyes were unavailable and they had to make do with what was found in nature or that they could produce from natural substances.  As such, all their pink colored beads were of the lighter hue. Any bright neon colored fuschia colored beads were of much much later production when synthetic chemicals were introduced.

Thus, the pink pineapples are thus one of the older beads in the Venetian catalog of beads.  These ones that I have probably date back to the mid to late 1800s.  They are increasingly more difficult to find and I lucked out because a collector consented to sell me some beads from her collection.  I think I’m going to just enjoy them for a bit before trying to do anything with them.

Hope you’ve enjoyed seeing these particular favorites of mine!

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Starting the year on the right foot

Hello friends, I hope your first of the year is a beautiful one! I recently acquired some gorgeous and rare beads and I thought what better way to start the year than to create something beautiful with them.
These beads are called pineapple beads after their distinctive pattern and they were made between the mid to late 1800s for the African trade. They are quite difficult to come by and I am very fortunate to add these to my collection.

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