The intersection of Fashion and the Automobile

| Fashion, Jewelry

IMG_3917Hello friends, remember my show last February?  I didn’t have much time to go around and check out the other booths. But during a lull, I took a quick look around and what immediately caught my eye was a lady in green with a gorgeous vintage Czech glass necklace and a pretty 1920s hat.  I just had to go up to her.  We got to talking and it turns out that we both share a love for vintage Czech jewelry.  It was so interesting talking to her that I spontaneously asked if I talk to her further, maybe even interview her later on.  Fortunately she agreed.

Lynn is actually part of a trio of ladies who curate Fashion and the Automobile, a touring exhibit that showcases a unique intersection between fashion and the automobile and the changes wrought in them by popular culture. The exhibit is composed of 10 eras with authentic clothes and accessories to reflect each decade.  The automobiles are rendered in fine art paintings, photographs and renderings.

Here are the three ladies decked out in all their finery!

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All three ladies share a passion for automobiles. Victoria says that this touring exhibit idea is the fruit of her lifelong fascination with cars and her interest in fashion.  Early on she recalls being brought by her mom to look at cars as they whizzed by.  Elaine, the third member of this talented trio (who left before I could take her picture!), co-owns with her husband over 20 vintage cars!  Lynn supplies the wonderful clothes and jewelry but is herself a lover of cars. She is a proud parent (as she calls herself) of a 1965 Herbie the Love Bug beetle.

What started out as 2 seemingly separate interests for the trio is married beautifully in an exhibit that is rich, varied and interesting.  Automobiles and fashion, as with all other objects, exist within a context of its times and this undeniably influences and changes it.   One example I could cite — when cars started to be more common and women started to drive more, they couldn’t very well get into these cars in those voluminous clothes of the 18th century.  By the time Ford was  mass producing his T-Models, women’s clothes had lost most of their bulky underpinings and waistlines were dropped. I’m sure this was a more comfortable way of tooling about in the T-Model.

From its beginnings in the Anton Art Center, the exhibit is a continuously evolving process for the three ladies.  They are constantly looking for ways to make it more interesting and rich for its audience, which is a growing one.   Now, they have people coming up to them and donating vintage gloves and hats and on one memorable occasion, a beautiful wedding dress from the 30s.  Their enthusiasm is contagious and one senses a palpable love for what they do.  They genuinely want to share the knowledge they’ve accumulated and its amazing how far they will work with grassroots museums all over the state.  They will happily set up the exhibit, give fashion presentations and even do a full on fashion show such as the upcoming Roaring Twenties Fashion Show that will be held on March 30 at the Lorenzo Cultural Center.

Oh and did I mention that there is a book?! Yes, all the years of research is going into a wonderful book that will accompany the exhibit.  That’s something I’m really looking forward to.

I’ve taken the liberty of sharing some photos of previous exhibits in order to show you their work.

Here are two beautiful Victorian gowns on display at the Ford T-Plex Museum, one of their first exhibits.fashionauto2

Lynn and a vintage Packard car from the 1920s at the Packard Proving Grounds car show.fashionauto5

A gorgeous bias cut 1930s gown with a 1934 Chrysler Airflow series car at the Chrysler Museum

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And finally, a sweet 50s red roses sweater and skirt set with a vintage Chrysler  also from the 50s.

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It was such a blast talking with these ladies!  Oh and I haven’t even talked about the jewelry yet! That’s a whole other post which I can’t wait to share with you all soon!

 

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